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Новости

[26.03.2012]

"Titanic" director makes first solo dive to Earth's deepest point

"Titanic" film director James Cameron has completed the world's first solo dive to the deepest-known point on Earth, reaching the bottom of the Pacific Ocean's Mariana Trench southwest of Guam in a specially designed submarine.

The filmmaker arrived at the site known as "Challenger Deep" shortly before 8 a.m. local time on Monday, reaching a depth of 35,756 feet, or roughly 7 miles beneath the ocean's surface, said the National Geographic Society, which is overseeing the expedition.

The low point of the Mariana Trench, a great canyon below the Pacific, has been reached by humans just once before, in 1960 when U.S. Navy Lieutenant Don Walsh and the late Swiss oceanographer Jacques Piccard spent 20 minutes there in the submersible craft Trieste.

Cameron, the first person to make a solo dive to the spot, spent about three hours on the bottom collecting research samples for marine biology, geology and geophysics and taking still photographs and video footage of the trench.

After a faster-than-expected 70-minute return ascent, he safely reached the surface at noon local time Monday (0200 GMT) about 300 miles southwest of the U.S. territory of Guam in the western Pacific, National Geographic said in a press statement.
The single-man vehicle piloted by Cameron, the Deepsea Challenger, stands 24 feet tall and was designed to descend upright and rotating at a speed of about 500 feet per minute.

The submersible represents breakthroughs in materials science, structural engineering and imaging through an ultra-small, full-ocean depth-rated stereoscopic camera.

While he is perhaps better known as director of such films as "Titanic," "Avatar" and "Aliens," Cameron is no stranger to underwater exploration. For "Titanic," he took 12 dives to the famed shipwreck in the North Atlantic, leading him to develop deep-sea film and exploration technology.